Flu vaccines are more important than ever this fall

The Madison Free Clinic will begin offering free flu shots to our patients soon. Stay tuned for details!

In the meantime, COVID-19 tests are available by appointment. Please contact intake@madisonfreeclinic.org for more information.

“COVID Toes” and Other Unusual Symptoms You Need to Know About

The majority of people with COVID toes — which Freeman likens to chilblains (also called pernio), an inflammatory skin condition that often occurs after exposure to very cold temperatures — don’t experience other symptoms of a coronavirus infection and don’t require hospitalization for care. “Many patients are developing these toe lesions well after their infection, or they’re otherwise completely asymptomatic, except for the toes,” she adds.

Stress and Diabetes – It’s a Catch-22

Stress affects everyone to some degree, but it may be more difficult to manage when people learn that they have diabetes. Diabetes is a relentless disease that requires constant attention, awareness, and decision-making. Diabetes self-management can therefore be demanding, complex, and stressful. In fact, it´s a wrenching dilemma as diabetes gets you stressed out and the stress worsens your diabetes.

The Covid-19 virus can linger on objects for as little as a few hours or as long as a couple days, depending on the surface. Here’s the research.

The Covid-19 virus can linger on objects for as little as a few hours or as long as a couple of days, depending on the surface. Here’s the research.

Children are not immune

In the last two weeks of July, nearly 100,000 children in the United States tested positive for the coronavirus, according to data from the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Children’s Hospital Association.

The speed and the scale of the infections — dozens of countries have not yet recorded 100,000 cases in total — further complicate the already daunting issue of reopening schools. In Georgia, Indiana and other states, some schools that reopened have already closed down again after new outbreaks emerged.

Recent research suggests that children can carry at least as much of the virus in their noses and throats as adults do, even if they have only mild or moderate symptoms. That has prompted fears that students who become ill at school may spread the virus to their older relatives.

But it’s not just older people who are at risk — in some rare cases, a child’s health can be severely affected. Nearly 600 young people in the U.S., from infants to 20-year-olds, have developed an inflammatory syndrome linked to Covid-19, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports. Most of the children required intensive care.

“I fear that there has been this sense that kids just won’t get infected or don’t get infected in the same way as adults and that, therefore, they’re almost like a bubbled population,” Michael Osterholm, an infectious disease expert at the University of Minnesota, told The Times in July.

“There will be a transmission,” he said. “What we have to do is accept that now and include that in our plans.”

Controlling Diabetes Takes on Greater Urgency During COVID-19 Pandemic

After cardiovascular disease, diabetes is the second most common underlying health condition associated with severe outcomes in COVID-19 patients, making people with diabetes six times more likely to be hospitalized and 12 times more likely to die than those without pre-existing, underlying conditions, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

But having diabetes under control can make all the difference.

COVID-19 Care Package

It’s been just over six months since the first known case of coronavirus surfaced in China, and less than that since the threat of the virus overtook normal life stateside and phrases like “social distancing” and “contact tracing” became lodged in our collective vocabulary. From rising unemployment statistics to promising drug trials, new information about this pandemic emerges constantly, and dozens of theories about how the disease spreads and can be treated get advanced or disproven on any given day. In recent weeks, debates have raged about everything from reopening schools to whether “COVID parties” are a thing (they’re not!). We’ve put together a guide to everything you need to know about this pandemic—be it how to keep your children entertained or how this outbreak is affecting the economy.

❓ From social distancing to viral spread to staying sane, here’s everything we know and advise about the coronavirus.

📦 The Covid-19 virus can linger on objects for as little as a few hours or as long as a couple of days, depending on the surface. Here’s the research.

😷 If you’re planning on going out in public anytime soon, you’re going to need a mask. Here are the best ones you can buy, or how to make one at home.

🧼 It’s not just your hands that need washing—your gadgets, clothes, and home need it too. Here’s how to properly disinfect your stuff.

💻 Some of you are work-from-home pros, but if you’re new to it, here’s how to stay productive without losing your mind.

😔 It’s hard not to be anxious about a global pandemic, but here’s how you can protect yourself and your family without spiraling, and how to not hate the loved ones you’re quarantined with.

✂️ It may still be a while before you can see your hairstylist, so here’s how to cut your hair at home, plus other ways to keep yourself lookin’ fresh.

🦠 Read all of our coronavirus coverage here (source).

Pinning hopes on the vaccine is not the right coronavirus strategy, expert says

While many hold out hopes for a vaccine to end the epidemic, one expert warns that vaccines are just part of the solution. Mask-wearing, shutting down some businesses, limiting large gatherings, and finding potential treatments will continue to be critical as a vaccine is still months away, and may not be completely effective even when there is one.

How to Boost Your Immunity

Some simple, practical steps can raise your resistance to viruses. As always, consult with a medical professional before making significant lifestyle changes

Diabetes and Bones – A Risky Business!

It´s estimated that worldwide an osteoporotic fracture occurs every 3 seconds, which amounts to almost 25 000 fractures per day or 9 million per year. Sadly, it´s quite likely to be a person living with diabetes as research shows that they are three times more likely to break a bone than persons how don’t have diabetes. Scientists have for years tried to figure out why the bones of people with both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes are so fragile.

 

Also, see https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4753802/