COVID-19 Care Package

It’s been just over six months since the first known case of coronavirus surfaced in China, and less than that since the threat of the virus overtook normal life stateside and phrases like “social distancing” and “contact tracing” became lodged in our collective vocabulary. From rising unemployment statistics to promising drug trials, new information about this pandemic emerges constantly, and dozens of theories about how the disease spreads and can be treated get advanced or disproven on any given day. In recent weeks, debates have raged about everything from reopening schools to whether “COVID parties” are a thing (they’re not!). We’ve put together a guide to everything you need to know about this pandemic—be it how to keep your children entertained or how this outbreak is affecting the economy.

❓ From social distancing to viral spread to staying sane, here’s everything we know and advise about the coronavirus.

📦 The Covid-19 virus can linger on objects for as little as a few hours or as long as a couple of days, depending on the surface. Here’s the research.

😷 If you’re planning on going out in public anytime soon, you’re going to need a mask. Here are the best ones you can buy, or how to make one at home.

🧼 It’s not just your hands that need washing—your gadgets, clothes, and home need it too. Here’s how to properly disinfect your stuff.

💻 Some of you are work-from-home pros, but if you’re new to it, here’s how to stay productive without losing your mind.

😔 It’s hard not to be anxious about a global pandemic, but here’s how you can protect yourself and your family without spiraling, and how to not hate the loved ones you’re quarantined with.

✂️ It may still be a while before you can see your hairstylist, so here’s how to cut your hair at home, plus other ways to keep yourself lookin’ fresh.

🦠 Read all of our coronavirus coverage here (source).

Pinning hopes on the vaccine is not the right coronavirus strategy, expert says

While many hold out hopes for a vaccine to end the epidemic, one expert warns that vaccines are just part of the solution. Mask-wearing, shutting down some businesses, limiting large gatherings, and finding potential treatments will continue to be critical as a vaccine is still months away, and may not be completely effective even when there is one.

How to Boost Your Immunity

Some simple, practical steps can raise your resistance to viruses. As always, consult with a medical professional before making significant lifestyle changes

Diabetes and Bones – A Risky Business!

It´s estimated that worldwide an osteoporotic fracture occurs every 3 seconds, which amounts to almost 25 000 fractures per day or 9 million per year. Sadly, it´s quite likely to be a person living with diabetes as research shows that they are three times more likely to break a bone than persons how don’t have diabetes. Scientists have for years tried to figure out why the bones of people with both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes are so fragile.

 

Also, see https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4753802/

The coronavirus has mutated

The coronavirus has mutated since it started spreading late last year, and a variant known as “G” is now dominant across the United States and the world. “The mutation doesn’t appear to make people sicker, but a growing number of scientists worry that it has made the virus more contagious,” our science desk wrote. Read the story to learn what makes coronavirus G different from the original version — and potentially more dangerous.

Can COVID-19 Cause Diabetes?

Please note that this is a preliminary finding. More research is needed to establish whether COVID-19 can cause diabetes.

In the past, viral infections have been linked to the first time a patient had diabetes symptoms, as viral infections may trigger the destruction of the insulin-producing islet cell “factories” in the pancreas, setting up a chronic autoimmune response. There are recorded cases of acute diabetes developing during mumps and enterovirus infections as well as significant evidence linking one particular enterovirus (Coxsackie-B1), with classical autoimmune type 1 diabetes.

WHO temporarily pauses studying hydroxychloroquine due to safety concerns

The World Health Organization has temporarily halted studying hydroxychloroquine as a potential Covid-19 treatment in its Solidarity Trial due to safety concerns, WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said during a briefing in Geneva on Monday.

The decision was made after an observational study was published in the medical journal The Lancet on Friday, which described how seriously ill Covid-19 patients who were treated with hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine were more likely to die.

CDC estimates that 35% of coronavirus patients don’t have symptoms

The CDC estimates more than a third of coronavirus patients don’t have any symptoms at all, and 40% of virus transmission happens before people feel sick. The figures are part of the agency’s new guidance for mathematical modelers and public health officials and are not supposed to be predictions of how many people could have or contract Covid-19. The CDC has also released mortality figures and scenarios intended to help public health preparedness. Under the most severe of the five scenarios outlined, the CDC lists asymptomatic case fatality ratio of 0.01, meaning that 1% of people overall with Covid-19 and symptoms would die. But some experts say the figures lowball the proportion of people who are succumbing to the disease.

Virginia free clinics care for more patients during the pandemic, as donations drop