Five Things to Remember When Interpreting Epidemiologic Data

We know that the number of cases we have on record is an underrepresentation of the true burden for several reasons. Some underrepresentation is because testing for SARS-CoV-2 might not be available for the infected person… Another factor is that not everyone will need to see a doctor for COVID-19. The World Health Organization (WHO) published a very detailed report about the outbreak of COVID-19 in China and found that 80% of cases were mild or moderate. Since then, there have been studies that have identified infections in people who never develop symptoms. If someone gets infected and recovers on their own, then public health may never find out about the case.

Scientists say a now-dominant strain of the coronavirus appears to be more contagious than original

Scientists have identified a new strain of the coronavirus that has become dominant worldwide and appears to be more contagious than the versions that spread in the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new study led by scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

In addition to spreading faster, it may make people vulnerable to a second infection after a first bout with the disease, the report warned.

How Eating Protein Affects Blood Sugar

Although proteins are broken down similarly to carbohydrates, they have different effects on blood glucose levels. Protein breakdown begins in the stomach where they are broken down into smaller substances and reach the intestines where they are broken down further into amino acids.

Understanding Medical Research: Your Facebook Friend is Wrong

News articles promoting bad science are shared via social media every day. These articles can go on to harm, frighten, or give false hope to vulnerable members of our communities. The best way to combat the dissemination of bad science is to educate yourself and call it out when you see it.

This course, designed for everyone, will give you the tools necessary to go beyond news articles and interpret the medical research for yourself. It’s filled with anecdotes, skits, animations, and real-world examples to clarify concepts and guide you through the different parts of a research paper.

Stick with it and by course’s end, you’ll understand, in a way you never have before, how medical research works, what research is trustworthy, and of course, when your Facebook Friend is wrong.

We hope you’ll join.

How to Stay Safe at the Grocery Store During Coronavirus Outbreak

If you need to venture out, “this is not the time to do impulsive shopping,” says June McKoy, M.D., associate professor of medicine at Northwestern Medicine. “Make your list and go in like a Marine goes in: Parachute in, do your business, parachute out.”

COVID-19 Online Symptom Check

  • Tell us your symptoms.
  • Get an idea of whether the symptoms you report suggest that you may have the COVID‑19 virus.
  • See what to do next.

Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. If you think you or someone in your care is seriously ill or has a medical emergency, call a doctor or 9-1-1 immediately (if non-US, call your national emergency number), regardless of the information offered here.

How to Think about COVID-19 like an M.D.

The curriculum, which was vetted by faculty members, provides a physician’s-eye view into the depths of the pandemic. It begins with first principles: the initial module covers virology and immunology. Readers are told that coronaviruses, in general, have the largest genomes of any RNA-based viruses that infect humans. And the curriculum details our prodigious ability to generate respiratory droplets through a sneeze (40,000 droplets) or cough (3,000) or just by talking (about 600 droplets per minute). A unit on epidemiology compares COVID-19 with the previous H1N1 flu pandemics of 1918 and 2009. Another module teaches how to don and doff personal protective equipment, and how to adjust the settings on a mechanical ventilator.

Wear a mask when you go to the grocery store

The country’s first 5,000 deaths from the coronavirus occurred in just over a month. The second 5,000 came in less than five days.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Friday reversed its earlier position on face masks to now recommend that people wear homemade ones in public, McClatchy News previously reported.

While cloth surgical masks provide little protection against viruses, they can help prevent people who already have coronavirus, perhaps without knowing it, from spreading the virus to others.

The CDC advises that people use homemade cloth coverings so the supply of disposable surgical masks and N95 respirator masks, which provide greater protection against viruses, goes to hospitals and medical professionals.

How often should I clean cloth face coverings?

Wash homemade cloth face masks or coverings after each use, advises infectious disease specialist Dr. Daniel Griffin at Columbia University, NPR reports.

“You don’t take this dirty mask off, put it in your purse and then stick it back on your face,” Griffin said, according to the network.

“It’s something that once you put on, is potentially either touching your coughs, sneezes or the spray of your speech, or protecting you from the coughs, spray, speech of other people,” he said, NPR reported. “And now it’s dirty. It needs to basically be either discarded or washed.”

The Health Benefits of Going Outside Are Critical While Social Distancing

Research has shown that the sensory input of nature (sights, sounds, smells, etc.) lights up signals in the brain that create a feeling of calm and well-being. This, as the song says, is more than a feeling — it indicates a reduction of stress chemicals and the inflammation they cause.

The less inflammation the body has to deal with on a regular basis, the more resources it has to fight unwanted intruders … like, say, a new virus.  

The Asian countries that beat COVID-19 have to do it again

What’s alarming about the numbers of new cases in the would-be success-story locations is that they’re happening at all—that the numbers were going down, and now they’re creeping up. From the outside, that looks like a worst-case scenario: the return of the disease after a country eases off the measures to combat it. But that appearance is deceiving. The bad new numbers come from somewhere else—literally. And that might have lessons for the next phase of the pandemic in the US.