How to Think about COVID-19 like an M.D.

The curriculum, which was vetted by faculty members, provides a physician’s-eye view into the depths of the pandemic. It begins with first principles: the initial module covers virology and immunology. Readers are told that coronaviruses, in general, have the largest genomes of any RNA-based viruses that infect humans. And the curriculum details our prodigious ability to generate respiratory droplets through a sneeze (40,000 droplets) or cough (3,000) or just by talking (about 600 droplets per minute). A unit on epidemiology compares COVID-19 with the previous H1N1 flu pandemics of 1918 and 2009. Another module teaches how to don and doff personal protective equipment, and how to adjust the settings on a mechanical ventilator.

Wear a mask when you go to the grocery store

The country’s first 5,000 deaths from the coronavirus occurred in just over a month. The second 5,000 came in less than five days.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Friday reversed its earlier position on face masks to now recommend that people wear homemade ones in public, McClatchy News previously reported.

While cloth surgical masks provide little protection against viruses, they can help prevent people who already have coronavirus, perhaps without knowing it, from spreading the virus to others.

The CDC advises that people use homemade cloth coverings so the supply of disposable surgical masks and N95 respirator masks, which provide greater protection against viruses, goes to hospitals and medical professionals.

How often should I clean cloth face coverings?

Wash homemade cloth face masks or coverings after each use, advises infectious disease specialist Dr. Daniel Griffin at Columbia University, NPR reports.

“You don’t take this dirty mask off, put it in your purse and then stick it back on your face,” Griffin said, according to the network.

“It’s something that once you put on, is potentially either touching your coughs, sneezes or the spray of your speech, or protecting you from the coughs, spray, speech of other people,” he said, NPR reported. “And now it’s dirty. It needs to basically be either discarded or washed.”

The Health Benefits of Going Outside Are Critical While Social Distancing

Research has shown that the sensory input of nature (sights, sounds, smells, etc.) lights up signals in the brain that create a feeling of calm and well-being. This, as the song says, is more than a feeling — it indicates a reduction of stress chemicals and the inflammation they cause.

The less inflammation the body has to deal with on a regular basis, the more resources it has to fight unwanted intruders … like, say, a new virus.  

The Asian countries that beat COVID-19 have to do it again

What’s alarming about the numbers of new cases in the would-be success-story locations is that they’re happening at all—that the numbers were going down, and now they’re creeping up. From the outside, that looks like a worst-case scenario: the return of the disease after a country eases off the measures to combat it. But that appearance is deceiving. The bad new numbers come from somewhere else—literally. And that might have lessons for the next phase of the pandemic in the US.

Free Wi-Fi for Madison Residents During COVID-19

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Ren LeVally
Phone: 540-948-3667
Email: info@madisonfreeclinic.org

MADISON FREE CLINIC ANNOUNCES AVAILABILITY OF FREE WIFI
Maintaining social distancing in the time of the COVID-19 emergency

Public Wi-FiMADISON, VA, April 6, 2020— The Madison Free Clinic, Inc. is pleased to announce that it has launched free Wi-Fi for our patients, students, job seekers, and other Madison residents impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. Effective April 8, 2020, our highspeed Internet will accessible in our parking lot regardless of whether the Clinic itself is open at the time.

The Clinic expects that those using the service do so in accordance with all relative State and Federal laws, and limit their usage to those productive purposes mentioned above, remaining respectful of overall bandwidth consumption. Please see the Acceptable Use Policy below.

The staff, patients, and volunteers of the clinic are extremely grateful to our partners and donors for their continued support during this unprecedented and challenging time.

 

The Madison Free Clinic, Inc. is 501(c)3 nonprofit organization providing medical, dental, vision and nutrition services to uninsured adults living in Madison County who meet certain financial qualifications.

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Guest Wireless Access Acceptable Use Policy (AUP)

This Policy is a guide to the acceptable use of the Madison Free Clinic’s public wi-fi services (Services). Any individual connected to the Clinic’s network in order to use it directly, or to connect to any other network(s), must comply with this policy and the stated purposes and Acceptable Use policies of any other network(s) or host(s) used. The following guidelines will be applied to determine whether or not a particular use of the Services is appropriate:

Users must respect the privacy of others. Users shall not intentionally seek information on, or represent themselves as, another user unless explicitly authorized to do so by that user. Nor shall Users obtain copies of, or modify files, other data, or passwords belonging to others.

Users must respect the legal protection applied to programs, data, photographs, music, written documents and other material as provided by copyright, trademark, patent, licensure and other proprietary rights mechanisms.

Users must respect the integrity of other public or private computing and network systems. Users shall not intentionally develop or use programs that harass other users or infiltrate any other computer, computing system or network and/or damage or alter the software components or file systems of a computer, computing system or network.

Use should be consistent with guiding ethical statements and accepted community standards. Use of the Services for malicious, fraudulent, or misrepresentative purposes is not acceptable.

The Services may not be used in ways that violate applicable laws or regulations.

The Services may not be used in a manner that precludes or significantly hampers network access by others. Nor may the Services be used in a manner that significantly impairs access to other networks connected to the Clinic’s network.

Connections that create routing patterns that are inconsistent with the effective and shared use of the Services may not be established.

Unsolicited advertising is not acceptable. Advertising is permitted on some Web pages, mailing lists, newsgroups, and similar environments if advertising is explicitly allowed in that environment.

Repeated, unsolicited and/or unwanted communication of an intrusive nature is strictly prohibited. Continuing to send e-mail messages or other communications to an individual or organization after being asked to stop is not acceptable.

By logging on, you agree to hold the Madison Free Clinic harmless for any damages that may result from access to the Internet or inappropriate usage.

The intent of this policy is to identify certain types of uses that are not appropriate, but this policy does not necessarily enumerate all possible inappropriate uses. Using the guidelines given above, we may at any time make a determination that a particular use is not appropriate.

Madison Free Clinic Announces Free Telemedicine Solution

Distance and travel time between patients and care providers can limit access to care. Fortunately, telemedicine can overcome geographic barriers to healthcare, especially for specialized providers. Telemedicine can be particularly beneficial for patients in medically underserved communities and those in rural geographical locations where clinician shortages exist.

A recent study showed that with telemedicine, patients had:

• 38% fewer hospital admissions
• 31% fewer hospital re-admissions
• 63% more likely to spend fewer days in the hospital
• Were more engaged in their healthcare

A strong doctor-patient relationship is the foundation for high-quality patient care and reducing health care costs. Telemedicine should support, not replace, traditional care delivery. With telemedicine care providers can continue to care for patients in-person care while still providing the flexibility and convenience of seeing patients remotely for follow up visits, check-ups, and education when appropriate or necessary.

Download (PDF)

5 Coronavirus Facts to Share

NBC-2.com WBBH News for Fort Myers, Cape Coral & Naples, Florida

This information doesn’t mean you should panic, but you do need to take the pandemic seriously. Everyone has a responsibility — not only to protect themselves, but to protect their friends, family, neighbors, and community. You don’t want to be a vector for the virus, and the best way to curb the outbreak is to strictly practice social distancing.

1. People are contagious very early on in the infection, potentially even before they’re symptomatic. A study conducted by researchers in Germany found that nine people infected with the novel coronavirus were shedding huge amounts of the virus — thousands to millions of copies — as early as Day One of their infection, when they had only mild, cold-like symptoms. In fact, virus levels in the nose and throat were highest on that first day and declined in the days after. This suggests that infected people are shedding the virus even before they are symptomatic.

2. It can take up to 11 days for symptoms to appear after infection. Research has shown that the median incubation period is five days. That means some people will develop symptoms sooner and some will develop them later. The study also reported that only 2.5% of people showed symptoms two days after exposure, and 97.5% of people were symptomatic after 11 days. This means that if you’ve come into contact with someone who has the virus, you need to quarantine for the full 14 days to be safe. This timeframe is especially important because you can be highly contagious during this time and not even know it (see point above).

3. The virus lives on surfaces for up to three days. In an experiment, scientists created an aerosol that contained the novel coronavirus to mimic how it would be spread by a sneeze, a cough, or an exhale. Then, they sprayed that aerosol onto different surfaces to see how long the virus could survive. On copper, the virus was detectable for up to four hours, on cardboard for up to 24 hours, and on plastics and stainless steel for two to three days. This means that objects can remain contaminated for a much longer time, and people can become infected with the virus if they touch the object and then touch their face. You can also get infected if you inhale a sick person’s sneeze, cough, or exhale.

4. The rate of the infection is growing exponentially. The WHO estimates the infection rate for the novel coronavirus is between 2 and 2.5, meaning that every person who gets sick will infect another two or three people. At that pace, the number of people with the virus will double every six days. This rate has led epidemiologists to predict that 40% to 70% of the population could contract the virus if extreme social distancing measures aren’t taken.

5. It’s not just old people who are getting seriously sick. A lot of young people have blown off the risk of Covid-19 because most of the deaths have been reported in people over the age of 60. However, a new report by the CDC found that in the U.S., 38% of people who were hospitalized for Covid-19 were between the ages of 20 and 54, and 12% of ICU beds were taken up by people aged 20 to 44 years. Even if the virus doesn’t kill you as a young person, it can still make you very sick.