Airborne transmission of SARS-CoV-2

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warned yesterday that the coronavirus spreads more readily than it had previously stated, after briefly posting and then removing a draft of the same advisory last month. The new guidance warns that in indoor settings with poor ventilation, contagion can spread via microscopic aerosol particles well beyond the 6-foot social distance many Americans have been observing.

A group of infectious-disease physicians and aerosol experts, in a letter published Monday in the journal Science, more strongly emphasized the airborne potential of the virus than the CDC did in its update.

COVID-19 testing is available free of charge for Free Clinic patients. Please call us at 540-948-3667 for more information.

CDC says airborne transmission plays a role in coronavirus spread in a long-awaited update after a website error last month

The update officially acknowledges growing evidence that under certain conditions, people farther than six feet apart can become infected by tiny droplets and particles that float in the air for minutes and hours, and that they play a role in the pandemic.

COVID-19 Care Package

It’s been just over six months since the first known case of coronavirus surfaced in China, and less than that since the threat of the virus overtook normal life stateside and phrases like “social distancing” and “contact tracing” became lodged in our collective vocabulary. From rising unemployment statistics to promising drug trials, new information about this pandemic emerges constantly, and dozens of theories about how the disease spreads and can be treated get advanced or disproven on any given day. In recent weeks, debates have raged about everything from reopening schools to whether “COVID parties” are a thing (they’re not!). We’ve put together a guide to everything you need to know about this pandemic—be it how to keep your children entertained or how this outbreak is affecting the economy.

❓ From social distancing to viral spread to staying sane, here’s everything we know and advise about the coronavirus.

📦 The Covid-19 virus can linger on objects for as little as a few hours or as long as a couple of days, depending on the surface. Here’s the research.

😷 If you’re planning on going out in public anytime soon, you’re going to need a mask. Here are the best ones you can buy, or how to make one at home.

🧼 It’s not just your hands that need washing—your gadgets, clothes, and home need it too. Here’s how to properly disinfect your stuff.

💻 Some of you are work-from-home pros, but if you’re new to it, here’s how to stay productive without losing your mind.

😔 It’s hard not to be anxious about a global pandemic, but here’s how you can protect yourself and your family without spiraling, and how to not hate the loved ones you’re quarantined with.

✂️ It may still be a while before you can see your hairstylist, so here’s how to cut your hair at home, plus other ways to keep yourself lookin’ fresh.

🦠 Read all of our coronavirus coverage here (source).

CDC estimates that 35% of coronavirus patients don’t have symptoms

The CDC estimates more than a third of coronavirus patients don’t have any symptoms at all, and 40% of virus transmission happens before people feel sick. The figures are part of the agency’s new guidance for mathematical modelers and public health officials and are not supposed to be predictions of how many people could have or contract Covid-19. The CDC has also released mortality figures and scenarios intended to help public health preparedness. Under the most severe of the five scenarios outlined, the CDC lists asymptomatic case fatality ratio of 0.01, meaning that 1% of people overall with Covid-19 and symptoms would die. But some experts say the figures lowball the proportion of people who are succumbing to the disease.

How to Stay Safe at the Grocery Store During Coronavirus Outbreak

If you need to venture out, “this is not the time to do impulsive shopping,” says June McKoy, M.D., associate professor of medicine at Northwestern Medicine. “Make your list and go in like a Marine goes in: Parachute in, do your business, parachute out.”