The Risks – Know Them – Avoid Them

Symptomatic people are not the only way the virus is shed. We know that at least 44% of all infectionsand the majority of community-acquired transmissionsoccur from people without any symptoms (asymptomatic or pre-symptomatic people). You can be shedding the virus into the environment for up to 5 days before symptoms begin.

Infectious people come in all ages, and they all shed different amounts of virus.

Wear a mask when you go to the grocery store

The country’s first 5,000 deaths from the coronavirus occurred in just over a month. The second 5,000 came in less than five days.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Friday reversed its earlier position on face masks to now recommend that people wear homemade ones in public, McClatchy News previously reported.

While cloth surgical masks provide little protection against viruses, they can help prevent people who already have coronavirus, perhaps without knowing it, from spreading the virus to others.

The CDC advises that people use homemade cloth coverings so the supply of disposable surgical masks and N95 respirator masks, which provide greater protection against viruses, goes to hospitals and medical professionals.

How often should I clean cloth face coverings?

Wash homemade cloth face masks or coverings after each use, advises infectious disease specialist Dr. Daniel Griffin at Columbia University, NPR reports.

“You don’t take this dirty mask off, put it in your purse and then stick it back on your face,” Griffin said, according to the network.

“It’s something that once you put on, is potentially either touching your coughs, sneezes or the spray of your speech, or protecting you from the coughs, spray, speech of other people,” he said, NPR reported. “And now it’s dirty. It needs to basically be either discarded or washed.”

The Asian countries that beat COVID-19 have to do it again

What’s alarming about the numbers of new cases in the would-be success-story locations is that they’re happening at all—that the numbers were going down, and now they’re creeping up. From the outside, that looks like a worst-case scenario: the return of the disease after a country eases off the measures to combat it. But that appearance is deceiving. The bad new numbers come from somewhere else—literally. And that might have lessons for the next phase of the pandemic in the US.

5 Coronavirus Facts to Share

NBC-2.com WBBH News for Fort Myers, Cape Coral & Naples, Florida

This information doesn’t mean you should panic, but you do need to take the pandemic seriously. Everyone has a responsibility — not only to protect themselves, but to protect their friends, family, neighbors, and community. You don’t want to be a vector for the virus, and the best way to curb the outbreak is to strictly practice social distancing.

1. People are contagious very early on in the infection, potentially even before they’re symptomatic. A study conducted by researchers in Germany found that nine people infected with the novel coronavirus were shedding huge amounts of the virus — thousands to millions of copies — as early as Day One of their infection, when they had only mild, cold-like symptoms. In fact, virus levels in the nose and throat were highest on that first day and declined in the days after. This suggests that infected people are shedding the virus even before they are symptomatic.

2. It can take up to 11 days for symptoms to appear after infection. Research has shown that the median incubation period is five days. That means some people will develop symptoms sooner and some will develop them later. The study also reported that only 2.5% of people showed symptoms two days after exposure, and 97.5% of people were symptomatic after 11 days. This means that if you’ve come into contact with someone who has the virus, you need to quarantine for the full 14 days to be safe. This timeframe is especially important because you can be highly contagious during this time and not even know it (see point above).

3. The virus lives on surfaces for up to three days. In an experiment, scientists created an aerosol that contained the novel coronavirus to mimic how it would be spread by a sneeze, a cough, or an exhale. Then, they sprayed that aerosol onto different surfaces to see how long the virus could survive. On copper, the virus was detectable for up to four hours, on cardboard for up to 24 hours, and on plastics and stainless steel for two to three days. This means that objects can remain contaminated for a much longer time, and people can become infected with the virus if they touch the object and then touch their face. You can also get infected if you inhale a sick person’s sneeze, cough, or exhale.

4. The rate of the infection is growing exponentially. The WHO estimates the infection rate for the novel coronavirus is between 2 and 2.5, meaning that every person who gets sick will infect another two or three people. At that pace, the number of people with the virus will double every six days. This rate has led epidemiologists to predict that 40% to 70% of the population could contract the virus if extreme social distancing measures aren’t taken.

5. It’s not just old people who are getting seriously sick. A lot of young people have blown off the risk of Covid-19 because most of the deaths have been reported in people over the age of 60. However, a new report by the CDC found that in the U.S., 38% of people who were hospitalized for Covid-19 were between the ages of 20 and 54, and 12% of ICU beds were taken up by people aged 20 to 44 years. Even if the virus doesn’t kill you as a young person, it can still make you very sick.